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Chemical Engineering

The Chemical Engineering guide provides links to information on all topics related to chemical engineering in relevant databases, journals, conference proceedings, technical reports, websites, professional societies, etc.

Parts of a Technical Paper

The basic parts of a scientific or technical paper are:

Title and Author Information
Abstract
Introduction
Literature Review
Methods
Results
Discussion
Conclusions
References and Appendices

Detailed Explanation for Each Part

Title and Author Information:

The title of your paper and any needed information about yourself (usually your name and institution).

Abstract:

A short (usually around 250-400 words) description of the paper. Should include what the purpose of the paper is (including the basic research question/problem), the basic design of your project, and the major findings.

Introduction:

A general introduction to your topic and what you expect to learn from your project or experiment. Your research question should be found here.

Literature Review:

An analysis of what has already been published about your chosen topic. Should be able to show how your research question fits into the context of your field.

Methods:

A description of everything you did in your experiment or project, step-by-step. Needs to be detailed enough so that any reader would be able to repeat each step exactly on their own.

Results:

What actually happened during your project or what you found at the end of your experiment. This is usually the best part to include the majority of your graphs, photos, tables, and other visual aids, as long as they help explain the results of your work.

Discussion:

An analysis of the results that integrates what you found into the wider body of research in your field. Can also include future hypotheses to be tested or future projects to build from your own.

Conclusion:

Can be included in the discussion if necessary. A final summary of the paper, including whether or not you were able to answer your original research question.

References and Appendices:

The reference page(s) is a list of all the sources you used to research and create your project/experiment, including everything cited in the literature review and methods sections. Remember to use the same citation style throughout the paper. An appendix would include any additional information about your work that you were not able to include within the body of your paper (like large datasets and figures) that would help readers better understand your results.