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ENGL 453: Victorian Novel

Dr. Womack

In-text Citation

Include an in-text citation when you refer to, summarize, paraphrase, or quote from another source. For every in-text citation in your paper, there must be a corresponding entry in your reference list.

MLA in-text citation style uses the author's last name and the page number from which the quotation or paraphrase is taken, for example: (Smith 163). If the source does not use page numbers, do not include a number in the parenthetical citation: (Smith).

For more information on in-text citation, see the MLA Style Center.

Example paragraph with in-text citation

A few researchers in the linguistics field have developed training programs designed to improve native speakers' ability to understand accented speech (Derwing et al. 246; Thomas 15). Their training techniques are based on the research described above indicating that comprehension improves with exposure to non-native speech. Derwing and others conducted their training with students preparing to be social workers, but note that other professionals who work with non-native speakers could benefit from a similar program (258).

Works Cited List

Derwing, Tracey M., et al. "Teaching Native Speakers to Listen to Foreign-accented Speech." Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, vol. 23, no. 4, 2002, pp. 245-259.

Thomas, Holly K. Training Strategies for Improving Listeners' Comprehension of Foreign-accented Speech. University of Colorado, Boulder, 2004.

Citing Articles

The 9th edition of the MLA Handbook recommends using the following core elements in every citation. If elements are missing from the source, they should be omitted from the citation.

Author.
Title of source.
Title of container,
Other contributors,
Version,
Number,
Publisher,
Publication date
Location.

For more information on citing articles see the MLA Style Center.

Article in a magazine:

Koren, Marina. “Astronomy’s Most Dazzling Era Is About to Begin.” The Atlantic, 24 Jan. 2022, www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2022/01/nasa-james-webb-space-telescope-journey/621352/

Article in a newspaper:

Bakalar, Nicholas. “To Hippos, a Wheeze and a Honk Mean More Than Just ‘Hello!’” The New York Times, 25 Jan. 2022, www.nytimes.com/2022/01/24/science/hippos.html.

Article in a scholarly journal:

Stock, Carol D. and Philip A. Fisher. “Language Delays Among Foster Children: Implications for Policy and Practice.” Child Welfare, vol. 40, no. 3, 2006, pp. 445-462.

Article in a scholarly journal from JSTOR:

Probst, Jennifer C., et al. "Increase in Numbers and Potential Phenological Adjustment of Ruby-Throated Hummingbirds (Archilochus Colubris) during Autumn Migration at Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, Eastern Pennsylvania, 1990–2014." The Wilson Journal of Ornithology, vol. 129, no. 2, 2017, pp. 360-364. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/26429801.

Book Review:

Rifkind, Donna. “Breaking Their Vows.” Review of The Mermaid Chair by Sue Monk Kidd. Washington Post, 10 Apr. 2005, p. T6.

Citing Web Pages

The 9th edition of the MLA Handbook recommends using the following core elements in every citation. If elements are missing from the source, they should be omitted from the citation.

Author.
Title of source.
Title of container,
Other contributors,
Version,
Number,
Publisher,
Publication date
Location.

For more information on citing web sources see the MLA Style Center.

Website with author:

Kraizer, Sherryll. Safe Child. Coalition for Children, 2022, www.safechild.org.

Web page with no author:

“Giant Panda.” World Wildlife Fund, 2022, www.worldwildlife.org/species/giant-panda.

Facebook Post:

World Wildlife Fund. “Happy Global Tiger Day.” Facebook, 25 Jan. 2022, www.facebook.com/worldwildlifefund.

Blog Post:

Roncevic, Mirela. “What Are Open Educational Resources and How Do They Fit Into the Growing Landscape of Scholarly Materials?” No Shelf Required, 25 Jan. 2022, www.noshelfrequired.com/what-are-open-educational-resources-and-how-do-they-fit-into-the-growing-landscape-of-open-access-scholarly-materials/.